As a gamer, you’re introduced to a diverse range of games spanning numerous genres and even platforms (PC, Mobile, Console). And if you come across something intriguing, it goes on your future “to-play” list.

Yes, you’ll play it when you’ve finished your backlog of 20 Steam titles acquired during the Summer Sale last year. But, what if you had no responsibilities and could spend your days playing video games?

While the concept seems amazing, we’re sure you won’t be able to complete all of the games available throughout your entire existence.

How many video games are there?

After some study, we’ve come up with a total of 1181019, 33554 games on Steam, 199 games on Uplay, 3125 games on GoG, 327491 games on Google Play, 811911 games on the App Store and 1893 PS4 games, 1760 Xbox One games, and 2330 Nintendo Switch games.

How I Discovered the Number of Video Games?

While you could count every single game released for the PC ever on Wikipedia, a much faster method to do so is to look at Steam and other online distribution systems like GoG, Uplay, Origin, and so on.

For mobile, we can check Statista, which provides information on the number of games accessible on the phone.

We’ll look at the Switch, PS4, and Xbox One for consoles because these are the most popular current-gen platforms.

Is this, however, the total amount of video games available?

Well, the answer isn’t nearly so simple. We need to think about exactly what we’re trying to define as a “video game” in this case.

Is it Triple-A games from major publishers such as Ea Sports, Ubisoft, and Activision?

Do we take into account indie games as well as casual/hyper-casual games on mobile? What about some homebrew game code that Eugene wrote when he was 15 in his bedroom?

Massive expansions, DLCs, and remakes are common for popular games.

Are those games considered different from the base version?

The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt, for example, is a fantastic RPG with engaging characters and a compelling plot.

However, CD Projekt Red developed two fantastic expansions, “Hearts of Stone” and “Blood and Wine,” that may be considered stand-alone games because they offer fresh stories and places to the basic game, as well as several hours of additional playtime and material.

What about remasters, such as Activision’s 2016 release of a remastered edition of Modern Warfare with improved graphics? Is that a game in and of itself?

Calculating the total number of games on each platform and adding them all up is an easy way to accomplish it.

But, even if Steam is the largest online game distribution channel, you have to understand that the PC industry isn’t entirely covered by Steam sales alone.

We must exclude games produced for earlier platforms such as the Apple II, Commodore 64, Sinclair Spectrum, and other really ancient personal computer platforms for the sake of simplicity. The same is true on the console side; we can’t account for titles launched on retro consoles like the SNES, Nintendo 64, and so on.

This is done for two reasons, they are:

First, it would be impossible to keep an account for all of the homebrew titles that people came up with for these older personal computers; and because many of these machines from the 1980s were user-programmable, we could be talking about tens of thousands of never-released independent games.

Secondly, many of these games were clones of great commercial blockbusters from the period, such as Space Invaders, Mario, or Pong. When it comes to retro consoles, it’s difficult to acquire an accurate figure because these sites feature nearly every hack ever produced for the original games, as well as local releases as separate games.

For example, back in the day, the US and European versions of certain console games were optimized differently—the games were identical but tuned for 50Hz TVs instead of 60Hz.

Finally,  Flash games and HTML5-based mini-games will not be counted. Because that will bring the total to millions of dollars. Hundreds of Flash games are available on just one website like this, and there are countless more.

Gaming Evolution

The video gaming business is now a multibillion-dollar business that has routinely outperformed film and music over the last decade. There are more games in our collection than there are people in Washington, DC. And the number continues to rise on a daily basis, with each passing day bringing in new highs.

Gaming as a type of entertainment is without a doubt unique, and it provides a unique form of storytelling that is unlike that of watching a movie. You are the hero of a game. You feel more involved, and we’re coming closer to lifelike pictures every year.

When Was The First Video Game Console Released?

Nearly three decades after the Nimatron, Ralph Baer presented his “Brown Box” prototype in 1967, the first video game machine designed for home usage arrived.

This would serve as the base for a number of future game consoles. The Brown Box would connect to your television and play games like ping pong, checkers, and a few sports. A light gun was even available for basic target shooting games.


So, these are the main and deep research about the video gaming era. You can also do the same, there are thousands of resources available on the internet, which if you can calculate you will get a conclusion. We hope you also enjoy this post, keep reading here for more.